Monthly Archives: December 2012

Wallpaper 2.0 – the code

//———————————————————————- //  you need processing to run this code // you can download processing from processing.org // //———————————————————————- //  hold mousekey pressed and move the mouse to change the image //——————————————————————- int breite, hoehe, groesse; float[] farbe; float shiftX, shiftY; … Continue reading

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Wallpaper 2.0

Recently I bought an inexpensive second-hand copy of “The armchair universe – an exploration of computer worlds” by A. K. Dewdney. Printed in 1988 it is a real classic. Computers now have much more colors, pixels and memory and they … Continue reading

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broken ornaments

Too perfect symmetry may become boring. If you have seen one-quarter of an Ornament of four-fold rotational symmetry you have seen it all. Thus I wanted to break the symmetry and I programmed the computer to make mistakes. At each … Continue reading

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A quasiperiodic tiling of squares and a space-filling curve

During my summer holidays I got an inspiration from the work of the french military architect Vauban. To be able to defend the walls of a city he built fortifications at its corners. Then, to defend the walls of the … Continue reading

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three-color symmetry from doubling the tiling of rhombs

I am going back to color-symmetries of quasiperiodic tilings. In “Three-color symmetry in rotation for the Stampfli tiling” I have shown that the twelve-fold rotational symmetry can exchange three colors if triangles are not considered.  A tiling of twelve-fold rotational symmetry … Continue reading

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rainbow flakes

Snowflakes cannot make rainbows, but what would it look like if they could. That’s not science – that’s fiction, based on a modified cellular automaton.

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better snowflakes

The artificial snowflakes of my earlier post have several defects in comparison to real snowflakes. First, the arms split up into five arms. But for real snowflakes they mostly split up only into three arms. Second, the edges should be … Continue reading

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